Tyra Sidberry, Director, Third Sector New England Diversity & Inclusion Initiative

 

This video was originally shared on blip.tv by tsne with a No license (All rights reserved) license.
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Tyra Sidberry, Director, Third Sector New England Diversity & Inclusion Initiative

This video was originally shared on blip.tv by tsne with a No license (All rights reserved) license.

Tyra Sidberry, Diversity & Inclusion Initiative Director, Third Sector New England

Ask yourself:

  • How does your work affect the mission? 
  • Who is a part of the conversations you have in doing your work?
  • Are there perspectives missing, and are constituents involved?
This video was originally shared on blip.tv by tsne with a No license (All rights reserved) license.

Tyra Sidberry, Director, Third Sector New England Diversity & Inclusion Initiative

This video was originally shared on blip.tv by tsne with a No license (All rights reserved) license.

As part of the new lecture series, Conversations with …, the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative of Third Sector New England hosted a presentation by Dr. Michael Eric Dyson for the region’s nonprofit community. The professor, CNN commentator, author and pundit spoke of the central role diversity and inclusion play in building cohesive and effective organizations – and strong communities.

He shared his insights on issues such as the politics of inclusion; the privilege of invisibility; institutional perpetuation of racism; challenging other “isms”; stereotypes and forms of bigotry; and rethinking the paradigm of race, bias, and class prejudice vs. concentrated poverty.

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    Part 4
This video was originally shared on blip.tv by tsne with a No license (All rights reserved) license.

So, Larry King and company have proclaimed, “It’s in to be Black.”  He explained, laughingly (and that’s the part that really got me), on one of his recent shows that his eight-year-old son wants to be Black.

When did it become appropriate for people in the news business to joke about race like bad comedians on cable networks?

So, I guess I wasn’t in before?

First, King is suggesting that being Black was out until he decreed otherwise. As a Black American, I’ve always thought that being Black was in. I either felt sorry for or angry at those pathetic people who acted otherwise — the people that unwittingly helped to galvanize the Civil Rights movement and the centuries-long activism (most of it left out of the history books) that came before it.

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